CAREERS

 

Build your career and define excellence with CIMA+

Job Search

General Application

   

 

 

 

 

STAR ACHIEVEMENTS

 

The realisation of our standards of excellence

 See them

 

 

 

 

Home / Company / Corporate Social Responsibility 

Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability

Corporate Social Responsibility, or CSR, is an essential means of establishing a dialogue with our stakeholders and ensuring satisfaction of their needs. Since our foundation in 1990, CIMA+ has always given great importance to giving back to the community through donations to various charitable organizations, particularly in the health and education sectors. Our employees’ well-being has also always been one of our primary concerns, as our ranking among the Best Employers in Canada testifies.

 

In order to communicate in a transparent manner with our various stakeholders, CIMA+ publishes a Corporate Social Responsibility Report every two years, guided by the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), an internationally recognized reporting methodology in terms of sustainable development. CIMA+ hired PricewaterhouseCoopers, an independent third party, to prepare a limited assurance report with respect to key performance indicators for five material aspects.

 

To view the CSR report, click here. To view the certification report, click here.

 

Sustainable development is one of the key values of the organization. As an engineering firm, we have the possibility of modelling a constructed landscape, through design and construction of infrastructure assets that ensure economic development, while reducing impacts on society and the environment. In 2011, CIMA+’s management engaged in a continuous improvement process, which led to the adoption of a sustainable development policy, and the creation of excellence centres to help employees acknowledge the various facets of sustainable development and integrate them into the projects entrusted to us. The projects presented below are examples of successful integration of sustainable development principles in the following areas of expertise:

 

Building

Restoration of North America’s oldest monastery

 

Restoration of North America’s oldest monastery

Construction costs: $24 million

 

  

There were two objectives in restoring the Monastère des Augustines: gather all of the archives and collections from the twelve monasteries and hospitals founded by the Augustinians under one roof; and reconfigure the hospitality infrastructure for visitors who wish to experience the lifestyle of these nuns.

 

In essence, the project focused on respecting the cultural heritage and delivering an authentic structure that complies with current standards, especially in terms of comfort. Contemporary concepts were blended with historical features in many ways, including discreetly integrating new electromechanical systems in keeping with the existing architectural elements and building a new, contemporary, glassed-in lobby with a walkway that connects the historical monastery with the Augustinians’ current residence.

 

The project was fraught with complications namely due to: the presence of asbestos, especially in the plumbing, which led to an increased risk of fire; the proximity of the nuns’ residential area and the Hôtel-Dieu du Québec hospital; and the necessity of maintaining access to certain areas (including the prayer sites).

 

In addition to the historical nature of this restoration project, a number of sustainable development elements were integrated into the design. Namely, this included increasing energy efficiency via a geothermal temperature control system that cools the residence in the summer and heats it in the winter. Throughout the project, efforts were made to reuse and recycle a variety of construction materials.
 

SCADA Data Centre

 

SCADA Data Centre

Construction costs: $1.83 million

 

Based in Edmonton, EPCOR provides drinking water, wastewater treatment services and electrical power to one million customers. CIMA+ was tasked with renovating and upgrading EPCOR’s SCADA Data Centre, a mission-critical control centre. More specifically, the mandate included identifying and designing improvements to the centre’s support

infrastructure, with a focus on energy efficiency. One example was the use of LED lighting, which saves on energy by producing more light and less heat than conventional lighting.

 

The Data Centre houses a large number of computers that produce a significant amount of heat, and therefore, the project engineers designed an optimized air-conditioning system. The technical solutions that were applied to the cooling system will generate substantial savings for the client, both economically and environmentally. Throughout the life cycle of the

site, the design will reduce the carbon footprint caused by the cooling and energy-distribution system by approximately ten years. In addition, the increased reliability of the SCADA Data Centre will translate into a considerable decrease in the number of unscheduled shutdowns for EPCOR customers.

 

Firehouse 59, Pierrefonds-Roxboro

 

Firehouse 59, Pierrefonds-Roxboro

Construction costs: $6.5 million

 

The town of Pierrefonds-Roxboro’s purpose for building a new environmentally efficient firehouse in 2012, was two-fold. Firstly, the town wanted to reduce the response time to the numerous residential neighbourhoods in the area, and secondly, provide firefighters with an exceptional level of comfort. Inaugurated in March 2014, the firehouse is architecturally

innovative in a setting that, at first sight, didn’t seem appropriate for such a purpose. In fact, the site was a former snow dump and dry material disposal site, but was repurposed by replanting native plant species that do not require irrigation, which helps to protect the nearby wetland. From an architectural perspective, the firehouse’s living quarters has a

unique layout that favours the use of natural light and provides a view of the nearby woodlot.

 

The building’s tower also boasts a visual feature, with service access to the roof, which highlights the building and its civic vocation.

 

Among the sustainable development elements that were integrated, it is worth mentioning the eight-well geothermal system that will generate energy savings in the realm of 43% in comparison with a benchmark building. In light of this, the investment will be recouped in less than 20 years. In addition, the building’s garage section has radiant floor heating,

a fresh air supply system equipped with a rotary heat exchanger and advanced controls, and windows that can be opened for increased comfort. Thanks to carefully selected environmental measures that focus on the training needs of the occupants, Firehouse 59 provides a healthy living space that houses nine firefighters, 24 hours a day.

 

The city of Montreal’s Firehouse 59 was awarded LEED-NC Gold certification, with the highest score available for this type of building in Québec (66 out of 110).

 

Institut des sciences de la forêt tempérée (ISFORT – Temperate forest science institute)

 

Institut des sciences de la forêt tempérée (ISFORT – Temperate forest science institute)

Construction costs: $2.51 million

 

The pavilion that houses ISFORT at the Université du Québec en Outaouais was honoured with the 2014 CECOBOIS Award of Excellence in the Exterior Cladding category. The building makes good use of a number of tree species that are native to North America, and stands out for its exterior cladding of eastern white cedar.

 

The use of panelized cladding was an innovative and effective solution, because it is easy to install and extremely strong. It allows for the fasteners to be concealed and for the wooden cladding to remain above ground level, which ensures the structure’s longevity. The electromechanical system controls are centralized in order to optimize energy use.

 

The panel of judges for the 2014 CECOBOIS Award of Excellence underscored the work done by the structural, civil and electromechanical team from CIMA+ in terms of erecting a sustainable building that features a sensible and thoughtful design. Our contribution involved defining the design details for the architectural cladding and the fasteners for the wooden panels, as well as designing the structure that supports the wooden panels.

 

Des Aventuriers elementary school

 

Des Aventuriers elementary school

Construction costs: $8.6 million

 

CIMA+ was tasked with creating the electromechanical design for a new two-storey elementary school in the City of Sherbrooke. A number of measures were implemented in order to improve energy efficiency, reduce energy needs and integrate renewable energy. These measures included the installation of energy-recovery systems and low-energy LED lighting devices, along with geothermal heating and cooling, which increases efficiency and minimizes maintenance costs. The designers also included charging stations, with the objective of encouraging the use of electric vehicles.

 

Head office of Caisse populaire Desjardins de Lévis

 

Head office of Caisse populaire Desjardins de Lévis

 

 

This 5,760 m² 4-story building is pursuing a Silver LEED-NC certification and hosts the head office of Caisse populaire Desjardins de Lévis (Québec) for its 225 employees, previously disseminated in different locations. The building aims at becoming a reference for the quality of a work environment, namely through the application of sustainable development principles. This concern translated into the optimization of thermal comfort, maximization of natural lighting, impeccable air quality and adequate acoustic environment.

 

The new head office will have a performance which is far superior to the MNECB. It will reduce the building’s overall energy consumption by 45%, despite the large quantity of glass surfaces. Based on energy simulations, the energy consumption will be reduced by 56% for heating, 35% for air conditioning, 45% for ventilation and 42% for lighting.

 

In order to achieve these exceptional performances, a chilled beam ventilation and air conditioning system has been designed. This system allows for optimal comfort at a minimal cost and an imperceptible sound level. The use of chilled beams also offers the advantage of reducing the size of ventilation ducts, reducing the height of ceiling spaces and therefore the building’s overall height.

 

In order to further reduce the energy bill, a geothermal system comprised of 21 600 foot deep wells was implemented in order to cover close to 80% of energy needs for heating and air conditioning. The geothermal field has a 60 ton capacity, which represents almost 60% of the buildings air conditioning load.

 

Westmount Recreation Center

 

Westmount Recreation Center

 

 

 

The city of Westmount (Québec) wanted to upgrade the sport infrastructure located in one of its most prestigious parks, by building a 7,400 m2 recreation centre including two indoor skating rinks, outdoor swimming pools, multifunctional rooms, a youth centre, administrative offices and public spaces.

 

In order to limit the visual impact on the surrounding residential area, the recreation centre was almost entirely built underground. As the site was sloped, the skating rinks were buried in the highest part and the other structures where integrated along the downward slope. This positioning allowed natural light to enter the building, more specifically so in spaces located on a mezzanine facing the ground level façades.

 

Covered with a green roof, the Westmount Recreation Centre blends well within the park extension, adding approximately 1.5 acre of green space. Only a part of the south-western walls and a small emergency exit pavilion emerge above ground level.

This project is pursuing a Gold LEED-NC certification.
 

Huron Early Learning Centre

 

Huron Early Learning Centre

 

Located in Ottawa (Ontario), this project consisted of the construction of a LEED certified Silver child care center featuring a sunlit central hub at its heart. The 3,000 ft2 daycare center integrates high and low tech systems to enhance the curriculum and expose both children and educators to environmental issues, using the building as an innovative learning tool. Our scope of services included the design and site supervision for the mechanical and electrical systems.

 

Montmagny court house

 

Montmagny court house

 

 

 

The expansion and redevelopment of the Montmagny court house, built in 1862, was necessary since it no longer adequately met the fundamental needs of a court house in terms of safety, comfort and serviceability.

 

Although the building is not a protected historical monument, the stone and brick masonry façade has significant value for the population of Montmagny. This is why the proposed solution consisted of dismantling the annexes, redeveloping and bringing the main building up to code, and building a two-storey extension at the back. As a result, the building’s size

was increased from 2,370 m2 to 4,415 m2, 1,250 m2 for the renovated existing structure and 3,140 m2 for the extension. The concept included the combination of various materials for the structural elements: reinforced concrete roof, steel roof, wooden roof, reinforced concrete floor, brick bearing walls, stone bearing walls, reinforced concrete bearing walls, reinforced

concrete cross walls and a rigid steel frame. This project called for a lot of ingenuity on our team’s part, especially since the building is located in an area of major seismic activity, and that we needed to adapt our design to a very unique architecture.

 

The rainwater management aspects of the project proved to be a real technical challenge, due to the presence of a number of underground structures (pads, geothermal systems, etc.), and of a high groundwater level that doesn’t allow infiltration and therefore limits the number of solutions available. The civil engineering design team demonstrated ingenuity in the development of a strategy based on a combination of several options: surface retention, waterproof underground retention pond and sodded surfaces.

 

This project is pursuing a Silver LEED-NC certification, and was performed using Revit software in a BIM environment.

 

 

Energy

Designing Canada’s largest solar farm

Designing Canada’s largest solar farm

 

 

Once completed, this solar farm project in Kingston, Ontario will generate 100 MW of renewable energy, which is enough to power 17,000 households. CIMA+ is proud to have played a part in this achievement by preparing and reviewing the technical specifications for the request for proposals, preparing electrical studies, and providing electrical design and civil engineering services.

 

Wind energy project to provide power for 13,800 households

Wind energy project to provide power for 13,800 households

 

 

The Témiscouata wind farms are located at two sites that house 32 wind turbines and generate a total of 75.2 MW, which is enough to power 13,800 homes in Québec. The first farm was a community project developed in partnership with the local RCM, delivering 23.5 MW of power. As of October 2014, 200 employees (40% of whom were local) had worked on the project, producing an estimated $3.5 million in direct spinoffs within the community, not accounting for salaries*. The second wind farm project, which is fully private, became a reality in November 2015. CIMA+ acted as the project manager for both of these projects, from the preliminary studies to commissioning.

 

Access to hydroelectricity for 27,000 households and businesses in Cameroon

Access to hydroelectricity for 27,000 households and businesses in Cameroon

 

 

CIMA+ International was tasked with validating the drawings and supervising construction work for the hydroelectric power station to be built at the foot of the Lom Pangar dam. The contract also included overall supervision of the construction of the high, medium and low-tension networks, the installation and connection of the street lighting system, the development of a master plan for Cameroon’s electrical transmission networks, and a review of the management plan with the objective to minimize the environmental impacts and anticipate aspects of social infrastructure to be implemented in the region (e.g.: health centres).

 

* Pelletier, Mario. Les parcs éoliens au Témiscouata – Plus de 3,5 millions en retombées jusqu’à maintenant. InfoDimanche.com, (October 3, 2014).

 

Engineering and design of transmission lines in Alberta

Engineering and design of transmission lines in Alberta

 

 

CIMA+ participated in the Hanna project in Alberta, which consisted of an estimated $800 million in overall modernization. Performed on behalf of Atco Electric, this project was required, in part, to ensure connection to windfarms located in South East Alberta. Over 30 substations and 17 transmission line projects were simultaneously delivered in fast-track mode, given the short deadline. In an effort to reduce environmental impacts, CIMA+ made sure to avoid wetlands and archeological sites when positioning the towers.

 

Development of three solar farms in Ontario

Development of three solar farms in Ontario

   

This project consisted of three solar farms, each with a capacity of 10 MW, connected to a 30 MW substation, to be connected to a 115 kV transmission line. CIMA+, as the owner`s engineer for Canadian Solar Solutions Inc., provided diverse studies, represented the owner in front of public utilities (OPA, Hydro One, IESO), reviewed the technical specifications and the electrical design, and supported the client during project implementation.

 

Wind farm in Eastern Quebec

Wind farm in Eastern Quebec

 

 

CIMA+ was mandated by Innergex inc. to complete the detailed engineering of the Viger-Denonville wind farm, which was integrated into the Hydro-Québec TransÉnergie network in December 2013. CIMA+ performed preliminary and detailed engineering as well as control and protection, civil, structural and electrical engineering services, and provided commissioning services and site supervision.

 

Environment

Promoting conservation

Promoting conservation

 

 

In 2015, CIMA+ was tasked with updating an inventory at the former St-Maurice firing range in Terrebonne, Québec. The objectives of the mandate were to document the changes in the size of the wetlands, add new observations pertaining to any special-status flora and fauna, and ultimately, validate the functions and value of the wetlands, and delineate both the critical and protective zones with the goal of ensuring proper maintenance.

The inventory of the 361-hectare territory demonstrated that the wetlands act as a retention basin for surface water, thus helping to prevent damage caused by sudden high-water incidents, such as flooding and stream erosion. It also revealed that the site is home to 18 special-status animal species and 5 special-status plant species, 3 of which are endangered and another 3 of which are threatened. In light of the density of the nearby urban development, this site boasts exceptional ecological characteristics, and deserves to be protected for the sake of ensuring the survival of the plant and animal species it contains.

 

Decontamination and rehabilitation of industrial and institutional sites

Decontamination and rehabilitation of industrial and institutional sites

The sources of energy that are most sustainable and also most acceptable from an environmental standpoint have been more clearly defined over the past 30 years. This is the reason why Hydro-Québec decided to close the Gentilly-2 nuclear power plant and the La Citière thermal power plant in favour of renewable sources of energy (i.e.: hydro and wind power) that generate fewer greenhouse gases (GHG). In 2014-2015, CIMA+ was tasked with carrying out the dismantling and environmental rehabilitation of the La Citière thermal power plant. The work was carried out in order to reduce the site’s ecological footprint and maximize the reuse and recycling of materials recovered during the dismantling. CIMA+ also plays a role in the steps leading up to the dismantling of the Gentilly-2 nuclear power plant.

CIMA+ is also working on the rehabilitation of a number of institutional sites, primarily by carrying out upgrades to schools and churches, some of which present a high risk of asbestos. This work includes the removal of mould and the restoration of plaster and wood mouldings. In light of the fact that inhaling asbestos fibres is hazardous to people’s health, CIMA+ ensures that all workers assigned to the various sites have received the proper training, that they are qualified to perform this type of work, and that the work complies with applicable regulations.

 

 

Impact studies on large-scale transportation projects

Impact studies on large-scale transportation projects

CIMA+ is taking part in the impact studies for a number of major transportation projects in the Greater Montreal Area. This includes the new Champlain Bridge crossing the Saint Lawrence River, and the construction of a light rail transit (LRT) system linking Montreal’s South Shore to the downtown core, which is now being merged into the Réseau électrique métropolitain (REM – metropolitan electric network) project sponsored by the Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec (CDPQ). The project team comprises approximately 50 experts in transportation (traffic engineering, road engineering, bridges and tunnels), urban planning, buildings, the environment, urban infrastructure, architecture, and project management. The REM impact study is being conducted according to an accelerated schedule with the objective to address growing public transit needs.

The objective of the REM project is to solve traffic congestion issues and problems with the saturation of roadways and public transit in the region, as well as to reduce the environmental impact of transportation. This engaging project, whose 67-kilometre route will be the third-longest automated transportation system in the world, represents an investment of $5.5 billion, 1,000 permanent jobs, and is estimated to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by close to 16,800 tonnes annually.*

*CDPQ Infra. Réseau électrique métropolitain. https://www.cdpqinfra.com/fr/Reseau_electrique_metropolitain

 

 

Rehabilitation of the former Île Sainte-Marie lighthouse site

Rehabilitation of the former Île Sainte-Marie lighthouse site

 

 
Environment Canada, Public Works and Government Services Canada, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) and CIMA+ jointly received an Award of Excellence from the Real Property Institute of Canada for this rehabilitation project. The activities related to the operation of the former lighthouse had caused heavy metal contamination on the island, which is a protected migratory bird sanctuary. The proposed rehabilitation program allowed
for the limiting of the excavation work and the significant related costs, while reducing the impact on the island’s fragile vegetation to a minimum, which is typical of subarctic environments.

Industry

Designing a carbon capture test centre

Designing a carbon capture test centre

Construction costs: $70 million

 

 

Coal-burning power plants provide nearly 18% of Canada’s total energy production, but they also produce approximately 14% of the country’s total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.* The carbon capture test centre that was developed by SaskPower in partnership with Hitachi, is located near the town of Estevan, Saskatchewan, and employs technology that allows for CO2 emissions from the burning of coal to be reduced by 120 tonnes per day. This centre will help to advance knowledge related to the carbon capture process by validating the efficiency, long-term stability, operability, maintainability and reliability of this innovative technology, which could become a model for the entire world.

 

The contribution that CIMA+ made to this cutting-edge sustainable development project involved producing drawings and specifications, and defining the technical specifications. Our specialists in Sherbrooke, Kelowna and Saskatoon designed a configuration that provides a great deal of flexibility in terms of testing different methods for reducing greenhouse gases.

 

*Natural Resources Canada. Clean coal, under Energy, Energy Sources and Distribution, Coal and CO2 Capture & Storage (December 22, 2015). https://www.nrcan.gc.ca/energy/coal/clean-coal/4279

Infrastructure

Feasibility study: Drinking water exploration Cree First Nation in Whapmagoostui

Feasibility study: Drinking water exploration Cree First Nation in Whapmagoostui

 

 

The Cree community of Whapmagoostui was faced with a very specific problem. There was only one single water well supplying two communities comprised of nearly 2,000 residents. In addition, the location and composition of the well made it vulnerable to seawater contamination from Hudson’s Bay. In fact, depending on the season, groundwater recharge is sometimes interrupted due to harsh climatic conditions, which poses a risk of salt water infiltration. In order to secure the drinking water supply for the two communities, CIMA+ conducted a feasibility study to determine the critical threshold for the existing well, and to propose potential sites for the construction of a second well.

 

 

An alternative design for an industrial zone

An alternative design for an industrial zone

 

Espace innovation Michelet is a site that is zoned for industrial and technological use, and exemplifies the optimum integration of best practices in terms of responsible development. This large-scale project, carried out on behalf of the City of Québec, included opening approximately 900 metres of road, the construction of waterworks, sanitary and storm-sewer infrastructure assets, underground utilities networks, street lighting and public roadways, including sidewalks and a bicycle paths, along with trails and recreation sites within the wooded area, as well as a 4,000 m3 storm-water retention basin.
 

CIMA+ had multiple objectives including: maximizing the use of green space, managing storm-water run-off, promoting the use of public transit and attenuating nuisance factors (noise, poor air quality, traffic, etc.). In order to design a hydraulic network that was as unobtrusive as possible and that blended well with the site’s natural conditions, especially in terms of integrating a small pond, the team analyzed a number of storm-water management models before designing a hybrid system that combines a naturally vegetated ditch for the flat section of the site with storm sewer pipes for the sloped section. This solution took into consideration the impermeable nature of the soil native to the site, the presence of a shallow bedrock, the significant slope of the terrain, and a number of requirements dictated by road maintenance operations.

 

Facilitating year-round active transportation

Facilitating year-round active transportation
 

The multi-purpose interpretation trail on Québec City’s Gilmour Hill is considered a heritage site. The woodland path has been closed during the winter for many years, due to the risks related to maintenance and snow removal. In 2014, the trail was rebuilt in order to allow for safe year-round access for cyclists and pedestrians.
 

There were a number of issues that complicated this project, including the need to protect the natural environment and to enhance the site’s historical potential, the sloping topography and the presence of friable and unstable bedrock. The construction of gabion walls presented a technical challenge due to the length of the trail (1.19 km) and the height of the walls, which exceeded standards, making it a first in Québec. Using this type of material gives the structures a historical look by providing a visual link between the top and bottom of Cap Diamant. There were many mature trees on the cliff and throughout the site, and therefore, special measures were required in order to preserve this vulnerable and fragile asset while rebuilding the trail.


 

Modernization of municipal infrastructure in Touba, Senegal

Modernization of municipal infrastructure in Touba, Senegal
 

 

Our subsidiary, CIMA International, was hired by the Agence Autonome de Travaux Routiers (AATR), for work supervision and control in conjunction with the modernization of the city of Touba in Senegal. Our services covered several civil engineering areas, the most important ones being: urban road development and improvement, construction of a sewer network in downtown Touba, landscape architecture and the protection of built infrastructure, drilling of wells and the construction of drinking water supply infrastructure, and public lighting. Mitigation strategies were implemented in order to minimize the negative impact of the work on the environment and beneficiary population. The project allowed for the implementation of better services in terms of road Transportation, access to drinking water, and sewers in a large city with an ever growing population.

 

Transportation

A local transportation plan in a high-traffic borough

A local transportation plan in a high-traffic borough

  

  

Given the borough of Montréal-Nord’s 62,630 morning rush-hour commutes and the 133,305 commutes per 24-hour period, the construction of major, new infrastructure assets, including the train and bus rapid transit (BRT) service, transportation in the area is slated for big improvements.

In 2015, CIMA+ developed the Plan local de déplacement (PLD – local transportation plan) under the direction of the borough, which is among the largest in the city, with approximately 84,000 residents. Producing a PLD is a requirement within the context of Montreal’s transportation plan (2008), but it also reflects a determination “to promote better sharing of roads among the various users, which would distinguish Montréal-Nord as a place with a welcoming, safe, pleasant and inclusive lifestyle that relies on public transit and active transportation (train, bus, cycling, walking), a harmonious blending of its various uses (residential, commercial, industrial and institutional), and the integration of sustainable development practices,”* especially focused on reducing the dependence on automobiles.

Carried out in cooperation with multiple local stakeholders representing retailers, major institutions, community groups, public transit users and administrators, the PLD inspired a consensus with respect to the borough’s commuting issues. Particular attention was also paid to consultations with citizens through a public forum.

* Ville de Montréal, Plan local de déplacement (PLD) Arrondissement Montréal-Nord, p.11 (April 16, 2016)

 

 

Construction of a lifeline bridge

Construction of a lifeline bridge
 

 

This project consisted of the construction of a 316 meter long, six-span, curved overpass bridge. The structure is located at the interchange for Highways 20 and 73, in Lévis, at the exit of the Pierre-Laporte Bridge, and it crosses over five highways and ramps. The bridge deck consists of a concrete slab supported by six I-shaped steel girders. The site’s geotechnical composition consists of loose granular and clay materials with a depth of between 5 and 15 meters over the bedrock. Drilled shafts with rock sockets were used as a foundation system. The construction of the approach embankments required lightweight backfill in order to ensure the stability of the retaining walls and banks which were built to specifically fit the site’s characteristics. The project also included the modification of the lighting system in the bridge’s vicinity.

As a lifeline, the bridge must be able to withstand, and remain functional after, a major earthquake. The seismic performance required by the Code for this type of bridge, combined with the site’s characteristics, made the design and construction of the foundation units very complex. An opportunity study performed by the designers revealed an interest in an innovative solution: seismic isolation. This technology allows for the dissociation of the superstructure from the ground motion by increasing its flexibility, which in some cases results in significantly smaller foundation units. The bridge deck was isolated at piers 3, 4 and 5 using lead-rubber bearings, which were submitted to prototype tests and quality control tests, under a program developed with contributions from CIMA+.

During construction, CIMA+’s supervision team focused on validating the contractor’s work methods to ensure user safety and reduce the impact on traffic management in this very busy sector.

Briefly stated, this complex, strategic large-scale project for the ministère des Transports du Québec contributed to further developing the state of the art for the seismic isolation of bridges in the province of Québec and around the world. Using seismic isolation in the construction of large-scale bridges is a promising development which will not only reduce the costs of new bridges, but also make the seismic rehabilitation of existing structures much easier.

 

Creation of a local commuter plan

Creation of a local commuter plan
 

 

Rosemont–La Petite-Patrie is the 3rd most densely populated borough and the 4th biggest employer in Montréal. A lot of vehicles pass through this sector due to its geographical position between the northern and southern parts of the Island of Montréal. The borough hired CIMA+ to create a local commuter plan that meets the requirements of the Montréal Transportation Plan (2008) and allows the borough to:
 

  •  Improve mobility and accessibility from and to the borough
  •  Improve residents’ quality of life
  •  Reduce the impacts of traffic on public health and the environment
  •  Contribute to the borough’s economic vitality
  •  Encourage the use of alternative modes to solo-car commuting
  •  Reduce transit traffic in local streets
  •  Enhance security and comfort for cyclists and pedestrians

The Local Commuter Plan was developed following a fully concerted approach between local stakeholders (merchants’ representative, major institutions, community groups), and users or professionals (STM, Communauto, Bixi) for the territory under study. Furthermore, the Local Commuter Plan promoted the emergence of a shared culture regarding commuting within the borough. Special attention was given to consulting citizens through the implementation of a web site to provide information and gather comments from the population. The Local Commuter Plan also takes into account the consultation led by Mobiligo, in which the employees working in local businesses were contacted to find out about their commuting needs.

 

The Rosemont – La-Petite-Patrie Local Commuter Plan is part of a sustainable development initiative, as it integrates all transportation modes (public, active and road) in a short-, midand long-term planning process. The Plan aims at improving citizens’ quality of life and allowing for the transition from solo car use to alternative commuting modes.

Pedestrian mobility master plan

Pedestrian mobility master plan
 

 

The purpose of this Master Plan is to establish a 20 year (2031) framework to improve the pedestrian mobility environment in Hamilton, Ontario. Mobility is a term that is inclusive to walking, running and movement with assistance devices such as scooters, wheelchairs and walkers.
 

The plan supports the City’s commitment to the International Charter for Walking signed by the City’s Mayor in 2008. The goal of the Master Plan is to provide pedestrian environments that are safe, attractive and accessible; and provide access to community institutions, recreational/leisure opportunities, employment and retail services. The plan seeks to achieve the pedestrian goals and objectives of the City’s Transportation Master Plan and new Official Plan.
 

This Master Plan study follows Phases 1 and 2 of the Municipal Engineers Association (MEA) Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (Class EA) process. The following techniques were used during Phase 1 to gather public input on the problems and opportunities associated with the existing pedestrian mobility environment:
 

  • Study notices advertised in local newspapers and mailed to agencies
  • Study updates on the City’s Project Website
  • Public meeting announcements on Facebook and Twitter
  • Meetings with a Pedestrian Advisory Group
  • On-line Pedestrian Mobility Survey, also available in hardcopy format
  • On-line Interactive Map (Community Walk), also available in hardcopy format
  • Public Information Centres with information boards, a presentation followed by ‘question and answer’ period, and comment sheets

The above efforts are reviewed collectively to establish a pedestrian profile and to identify priority areas for improvements in safety, comfort, mobility and connectivity. The end result leads to a formal identification of problems and opportunities to be addressed during Phase 2 of the study.

 

 

CIMA+ © 2012

All rights reserved

Follow us on :

 Best Employers in Canada

Français  |  Site Map